All posts by TC Kirkham

As The Eucalyptus Turns…

eucalyptusI don’t think they’re still in business anymore, but Eucalyptus Records and Tapes was a store in Spokane, WA that I had heard about and wanted to check out. By this point, The Music Box was still around, but I needed to try out more of the stores in the area.

One afternoon in the mid-summer of 1979, I made a trip to Spokane to spend my money, and headed up to north Division St, almost up to the Northtown Shopping Center. I pulled into the store, a free standing store, the first I’d ever been in that wasn’t part of either a strip or a full shopping mall.  I walked in, and there were two clerks on duty – both were in their early 20s, I’d say, and both were dressed very nicely. Probably college students somewhere in the area. They smiled when I walked in and said “Hi”. I was one of only two or three people in the store at the time, as it was only mid-morning, and I had several other record stores to visit that day, including DJ’s Sound City in the new “Mini” Mall area of Northtown.

Eucalyptus Records and Tapes was set up a lot like the Odyssey Records store downtown, except it wasn’t nearly as crowded. I was able to leisurely stroll through the store, checking my list, and perusing the bins in search of a discovery or two, as opposed to getting pushed and shoved by 100 people all doing what I was doing.

By this point, I was heavily into disco, and was buying more and more 12-inch single remixes, and I found one ofKeane Brothers - Taking Off Chic’s “I Want Your Love” on pink vinyl. Ok, had to have that. Also picked up two or three more 12-inch singles, including one of Leif Garrett’s “Feel The Need”, which was the current single from the teen idol at the time. Then I hit the motherlode – well, for me at least – the store actually had a copy of the new album by The Keane Brothers, “Taking Off“; it had come out three months earlier and NO ONE had it – and it couldn’t be special ordered at that time because the album was one of the last released on ABC Records before MCA bought them out, and MCA had declined to pick up their contract in the buyout. So I snatched it up. I picked up a few more 45s, and then headed to the counter.

The tall lanky dark haired clerk snorted as he went through the pile ringing my purchases up…”Hey, better make sure you don’t get whiplash, going between this kind of stuff.”, he chuckled, obviously amused at his little joke, as did his other friend, the blond clerk, who intoned with a serious voice, “I don’t know, do you think you can handle it?”

I smiled, and told them I could, as I’d been writing about music since I was a small child, and that I had a wide range of tastes. They continued their condescending attitude until the purchase was rung, and I handed them the money.

I was so mad I could scream, but I didn’t show it. I kept the smile glued on my face until I left the building and I never went back to Eucalyptus Records and Tapes again. I found their attitudes completely unacceptable, and I found DJ’s in the mall much more hospitable to my eclectic tastes…

My “last farewell” in a Tacoma record store…

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I’m repurposing this from one of my old “Song Of The Day” entries on “The Kirkham Report“, but the story has to be told here as well…because…well…it just FITS, you know?

Roger Whittaker is known throughout the world as one of the most popular crooners of the 1970’s. Yet in America, he was virtually unknown until his song “The Last Farewell” catapulted him to the top of the MOR/AC charts here in the States.

Got a Mom story for you, if you weel….heh heh heh…picture a twelve year old TC  in the summer of 1975. (Or maybe not…don’t want you running off screaming…heh heh)

My mother loved that song from the moment she first heard it. Now, she’s always been partial to crooners like Dean Martin, Perry Como, Al Martino, and the like. And “The Last Farewell“…well, she just LOVED it. She’d go around humming it to herself while cooking dinner or doing the laundry, etc.

In fact, she loved it so much, she asked me if I was planning to buy it when I got my allowance one week. I told her sure, I could get it, because I liked it too. But I told her it was a back up. But that week it turned out that two other songs I wanted were out at the local record store I frequented then, and so I grabbed a copy of the song for her.

The look I got from the clerk was priceless. The clerk at the record store – it was in a strip mall up the street from the Narrows Bridge in Tacoma Washington (and anyone who might know what this place was, PLEASE get in touch – I’m trying to find the name of it, and photos if anyone has them – it was somewhere in the 6000 -7000 address range (I think) on Sixth Avenue in the same plaza as an old “Wigwam” store and a small Chinese restaurant among other businesses) – was what we could loosely term a “hippie”. He was probably in his late teens or early twenties, with long reddish-brown hair pulled back into a ponytail (oh MAN how I wanted his hair..it was so cool). He always wore loose fitting clothes that were usually pea soup green in color (I can’t remember the name of the store, but I vividly remember the clerk’s clothes…go figure…).

So after perusing the singles bin that morning,  and picking up an album I wanted as well, my 12 year old self brought to the counter that day the 45 of The Last Farewell by Roger Whittaker along with:
1 45 of Walking In Rhythm by the Blackbirds
1 45 of The Hustle by Van McCoy
1 LP of Windsong by John Denver

The whiplash on the store clerk’s neck as he looked through my purchases…it was priceless. I laughed my ass off when I left the store.  Apparently the clerk couldn’t wrap his mind around a somewhat plump, long-haired twelve year old who liked disco, folk, and crooners at the same time.

A few years later I had a similar experience at a Eucalyptus Records and Tapes store in Spokane…but that’s ANOTHER story…heh heh heh…

Anyway, both my mom and I remain Roger Whittaker fans to this day…and we’ve never forgotten that story…and forty years later to the month – YIKES! – I still laugh when I remember that poor clerk’s face…ROTFL….

My own personal “Music Box” dancer…

ist2_7596973-discoAlthough I’ve been listening to music since I can remember, and buying records since I was about three, for the most part from that time until my teen years, I purchased records in regular stores. There was a large bin for records at a number of local stores when I was growing up in Ohio – Ben Franklin in Utica, Twin Fair and Seaway in Newark, Kings and Arro in Heath, and others. And while I went to a few stores devoted to records as a child, including one in Tacoma WA that I can’t remember the name of (though I remember the clerks faces, go figure), my true haven was a little mom-and-pop owned record store in Spokane, Washington. It was called “The Music Box“, and was a bit of a hike from the downtown shopping area that had been revitalized by Expo ’74. Eventually, they’d extend the skybridges through the local buildings to the Music Box‘s block. But usually it meant going through the bridges to Pay N Save, then going down the stairs and walking the remaining two blocks to the store. When we came to town a couple times a year from Harrington, where I lived (50 miles southwest), The Music Box was the first place I headed with the list of records I wanted.

I loved this place. It was small and homey, had a few bins for albums, and they kept the 45s behind the counter in a rack where they were sorted by record label. You went to the counter, worked with the always friendly ladies that worked there going through Billboard’s Hot 100, and they pulled what you wanted out and gave it to you. If they had it, it was yours for 99 cents.  And if they didn’t have it, they could special order it for you using the old Phonolog catalog.  I mean, you could do the same at Odyssey Records, a large chain store down the street a few blocks. But it wasn’t the same homey feel.

The Music Box also took mail order and would even ship them to you for $3.00. But usually I would send them a list of stuff, and then a few days later, I’d get a list back showing me what was being held, what wasn’t available, and what they’d special ordered for me. And I would write them back and let them know when I would be in, and would stop by and pick up the lot. They were very cool.

And then it was over.

Without a word to any of their loyal customers, they suddenly closed up shop, not long after the skybridge to their area was completed. It was Summer 1980 (I think), and they simply couldn’t compete with the local chain stores anymore. I mean, with records and tapes available from at least 6 stores in the Skywalk network (Penneys, The Crescent, The Bon Marche, Pay N Save, and two other stores), it was hard for them to compete. So after nearly 40 years of service to the Spokane area, they were gone. Poof. And I found out the hard way – my latest order list was returned to me as undeliverable. Even Odyssey had gone bankrupt by this time – they went belly up in December 1979, which I found out when we were on our way back home from Disneyland, and I trekked up the street from the bus station to it’s location in Fresno, CA only to find an “out of business” sign in their window.

Now, I WAS driving by this point, but our car had fallen apart at the end of the previous summer after I’d had a semi-major accident (thankfully neither I nor my passenger were injured). So I depended on the Greyhound to get me to and from Spokane, and so couldn’t make it up there very often. When I had the car, I had a number of other record stores I could get to, such as DJ’s Records and Tapes in Northtown’s new “mini-mall” area, and Eucalyptus Records and Tapes down the street. But they were out of my way once the car crapped out; no real way to get to them. And I missed my Music Box anyway…it was an experience I will never forget. It has always been my FAVORITE record store of any kind. Some others have come close, but NONE ever gave the personal service that they did, and I will always be in their debt for making me the collector I have become.

Welcome to the world of the past…

Kim and I have been perusing some of the retail sites online lately. I’m fascinated by the “dead mall” concept, and businesses that have gone under in the economy or bankrupt for another reason. And we got to talking, and thought about how much fun it might be to take a few trips down memory lane about our favorite hangouts – record and book stores.

One of the things that drew us together as a couple all those 20+ years ago was our mutual love for books and music. We both love to read, love all kinds of music, and loved to spend hours upon countless hours going through bookstores and record stores looking for those little gems you can only find and treasure by looking through the shelves and bins at random, not knowing exactly what you’re looking for.

Now, the days of book and record stores are sadly mostly part of a fading past, thanks to online retailing, digital music files, and electronic books. And so while we have jumped headlong (and somewhat begrudgingly) into the modern era, we kinda miss those good old days too.  So we’re gonna use this blog to do a number of things.

First off, we’ll be talking about the past – stores we loved that are no longer there. We may approach you if you have some photos or something online for permission to use some of them, so we can show everyone what we’re talking about.

Second, we’ll be talking about today – the stores that are still there, and where you can visit them. We’re going to be watching for these little places throughout our travels, and hopefully will be able to bring you some pix as well.

Third, we’re going to talk about favorite books and favorite music. This blog, which will be one of two blogs to supplement my main music site, The Kirkham Report (the other blog being “My Life As A Soundtrack“, coming soon), will give you our feelings on some of our favorite books and records over the years – we may have links to music, to books, to charts, or anything else that might strike our fancy.

Fourth, I’m going to talk about my collection of records and my love for radio. Some of this is already available on the TKR site, but I’m going to talk about specific things – label art, album artwork, picture sleeves, and the like – the stuff that makes magic for me. Popular or obscure, chances are good you’ll find it here.

Fifth, Kim will be doing the same about her collection of books – her LARGE collection of books takes up half the living room, and she too has little things that make magic for her. In fact, her first column is already ready about her love for book stores, and will be posted shortly.

Sixth – we’re hoping to be talking to YOU. We will be encouraging you to find these little out of the way places still out there and to let us know about them. We’ll have a comment form up in a couple days where you can contact us, and we’ll always give full credit to everyone who contributes!

And there’s probably tons more that we’re not thinking of right now, but I’m sure other things will pop up here too!

We hope you enjoy the trips down memory lane we’ll be offering, and also will take the time to check out more of the PNRNetworks family! Enjoy!

TC N Kim, June 27 2015